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Collage of Indiana Woman

 

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On February 25th, 1897, The Indianapolis News ran this notice:  "Wanted -- Ladies of good appearance and address to take orders for the Indiana Woman, the largest and handsomest illustrated weekly journal in the world for $1 per year.  To ladies of education and refinement most liberal terms will be made.  Call between 5 and 6.  Correspondence solicited from residents in Indiana towns.  Circulation Dept. The Indiana Woman, third floor, 49 N. Illinois St. corner Market."

 

The Indiana Woman was a weekly magazine published by Earl E. Stafford, owner of The Indiana Illustrating Company.  Stafford had established his company and began printing the magazine in 1895. It was discontinued in 1899 and replaced by The Illustrated Indiana Weekly.  During the 19th century, magazines focusing on women blossomed across the country with such publications as Godey's Lady's Book, The Ladies Home Journal, and Good Housekeeping.  These magazines often provided information about home life, works of fictions and poetry, and popular women’s issues as well as focused advertising towards women.

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The first few lines of the opening paragraph from the first issue of the magazine read: "The Indianapolis Woman believes it has a number of reasons for coming into existence. It realizes to what a liberal degree the women of Indiana are taking up with unending interest the high-class publications of to-day; how exacting the readers are that they shall be right in a literary and in an artistic way. It believes that the affairs of most importance to women and those which they most seek are home affairs, home society, home art, home literature."

 
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